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Dr Kirsty Pringle

University of Newcastle

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Aside from her work as a research fellow, Dr Pringle is part of the Priority Research Centre for Reproductive Sciences. Her current research examines the role of enzyme systems in pregnancy. With Professor Eugenie Lumbers she has helped to set up and now successfully manages a research team at the University of Newcastle. Her recent publications, NHMRC grant success (as CIA) and invitations to present at international meetings in highly specialised areas attests to her dedication to the field and highlights her research output. Dr Pringle is now successfully coordinating a productive research team, supervising postgraduate students and working and collaborating independently. She has a BSc (Hons) and PhD in Obstetrics and Gynaecology from the University of Adelaide (2008). During her postgraduate studies Dr Pringle research focused on the molecular regulators of placentation.

Media Articles: 1

Kidney disease in Aboriginal Australians perpetuates poverty

The recent death of the lead singer of Yothu Yindi, is a high-profile example of an event all too common in Aboriginal Australia. Older Aboriginal Australians (40 to 60 years old) are more than 15 times more likely to die of kidney disease than non-Aboriginal Australians. This is an age that's normally the prime life. But not only is it a tragedy for the individuals involved but has a much wider effect on the community. Elders in all communities are a repository of knowledge and of accumulated wealth. Early death of key...

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Government Grants: 4

Concluding January 1, 2020

The overall aim of this project is to provide novel insights into the basic cellular processes that underpin placental development and to improve our ability to manipulate mammalian reproduction, both human and animal. The placenta is critical for intrauterine development because it determines the level of nutrition, oxygenation and maternal tolerance to the developing foetus. The project intends to explore the role of prorenin and its receptor as a novel mechanism driving placentation. Applications for expected project outcomes may include improved breeding of threatened animal species and economically valuable domestic animals as well as improved health care and fertility control for domesticated pets and feral animals.

$690K

Concluding January 1, 2020

Preterm birth is the largest cause of death in infants and males are more likely to be born preterm than females. We propose that the intrauterine renin-angiotensin system, the activity of which is regulated in a sex-specific manner, plays a critical role in protecting against preterm labour. Our study will further our understanding of the mechanisms of preterm labour and provide new insight into the sex-specific differences in the prevalence of preterm birth.

$462K

Concluding January 1, 2020

Preterm birth is the largest cause of death in infants and males are more likely to be born preterm than females. We propose that the intrauterine renin-angiotensin system, the activity of which is regulated in a sex-specific manner, plays a critical role in protecting against preterm labour. Our study will further our understanding of the mechanisms of preterm labour and provide new insight into the sex-specific differences in the prevalence of preterm birth.

$456K

Concluding January 1, 2017

Indigenous women are twice as likely to have low birth weight babies compared to non-Indigenous women and 2.5 times as likely to develop preeclampsia, possibly because they have a much greater incidence of chronic kidney disease, predisposing them to these pregnancy outcomes. We have found a new, sensitive marker of early stage renal dysfunction in pregnancy that could be useful for detecting early stage renal disease and which is indicative of an increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcome.

$645K

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