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Kylie Pappalardo

Queensland University of Technology

Kylie Pappalardo researches in intellectual property and innovation law, focusing primarily on the intersection between copyright and creativity. She is a Lecturer in the Law School at the Queensland University of Technology (QUT) in Brisbane, Australia, where she leads the research program on copyright law and creative communities. Kylie is also a member of the cross-disciplinary Digital Media Research Centre at QUT. Kylie completed her PhD on the regulation of ISPs and other internet intermediaries for online copyright infringement in 2016. She holds degrees in Law and Creative Writing from QUT and a Masters of Law from Georgetown University in Washington D.C. Kylie has been a senior researcher with the Open Access to Knowledge (OAK) Law Project and with Creative Commons Australia. She has also worked with the Arts Law Centre of Queensland and served on the board of Youth Arts Queensland. Kylie teaches intellectual property, internet law and tort law in QUT's undergraduate and postgraduate law programs.

Media Articles: 6

Explainer: can you copyright furniture?

Furniture stores are often filled with designs that look similar to others. But is copying furniture legal, and should we feel bad about buying replicas? Recently, interior designers accused the supermarket Aldi of copying an Australian designer's stool in the launch of a new range of "luxe" furniture. Some, including the Design Institute of Australia, noted...

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How copyright law is holding back Australian creators

Australian creators struggle to understand copyright law and how to manage it for their own projects. Indeed, a new study has found copyright law can act as a deterrent to creation, rather than an incentive for it. Interviews with 29 Australian creators, including documentary filmmakers, writers, musicians and visual artists, sought to understand how they reuse existing content to create. It considered issues such as whether permission ("licences") had been sought to reuse copyrighted...

Read more on The Conversation

Australian tech start-ups stand to lose out in proposed copyright reforms

The Australian government quietly introduced the Copyright Amendment (Service Providers) Bill 2017 to the Senate on Wednesday. If enacted, the bill will extend the scope of Australia’s copyright safe harbours - very slightly. Safe harbours protect internet hosts and platform providers from monetary liability for copyright-infringing content posted or shared by their users. For example, if you post the latest Thor movie...

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Blocking access to illegal file-share websites won't stop illegal downloading

The Australian Federal Court ruled today that TPG, Optus, Telstra and other internet service providers (ISPs) must take "reasonable steps" to stop customers accessing file-sharing websites The Pirate Bay, IsoHunt, TorrentHound and Torrentz. In total, Australian ISPs must block access to 61 domains registered to...

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What now after the Dallas Buyers Club pirate claim is rejected as 'surreal'?

The makers of Dallas Buyers Club have been dealt a blow in their attempt to extract payment from people alleged to have downloaded illegal copies of the movie. Voltage Pictures, which owns Dallas Buyers Club, has been trying to identify over 4,700 iiNet subscribers who it alleges downloaded illicit...

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Academic Publications: 50

January 1, 2018

The liability of Australian online intermediaries

January 1, 2018

Digital Rights Watch submission to Senate Environment and Communications Legislation Committee Enquiry into the Copyright Amendment (Service Providers) Bill 2017

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